#logofail

I think that I shall never see / A directory lovely as a tree
I think that I shall never see / A directory lovely as a tree

This is from Arz Fine Foods. Their logo is a tree. On this receipt, they’ve got a tree alright, but no-one expected an MS-DOS directory tree. I think, as we sort of say in Scotland, that someone made an arz of this …

(I’m not hating on Arz, btw. They have an epic selection of foods, including fresh Sukkari dates.)

Hershey Writes Again

Major breakthrough: yesterday, I got the old Hershey fonts outlined properly, and today I have compiled them (sorta) into vector fonts. They’re not yet ready for release, as they have no metadata and are missing some key characters (even for ASCII).

I based the line thicknesses for the fonts as if I were drawing a 16 pt character, and using a plotter with a 0.3 mm (light), 0.7 mm (medium) and 1.0 mm (heavy) pen. You can see in the individual characters from the Hershey Complex font shown below, that the double hairline strokes merge into thicker single strokes. The same effect occurs on a real plotter, too:

S_AVHersheyComplexLightS_AVHersheyComplexMediumS_AVHersheyComplexHeavy

Here are some preliminary bitmap samples:

Complex Heavy
Complex Heavy
Complex Light
Complex Light
Complex Medium
Complex Medium
Simplex Heavy
Simplex Heavy
Simplex Light
Simplex Light
Simplex Medium
Simplex Medium

Progress on Hershey font outlines

Hershey Simplex says Hello

I still have lots of work to do, but at least now I can make buffered outlines of the 1967-vintage Hershey character glyphs into Fontforge-friendly vectors.

My goal is to release these as OTF fonts, rendered as it they’d been drawn by a constant line width pen plotter or film recorder, as was used in Dr Hershey’s day. Frank at Kiosk Fonts has loftier goals, and may actually release pretty fonts one day …

Sample book, freshly bound at the Asquith Press

Sample book, freshly bound at the Asquith Press

The Asquith Press is quite nifty, with its print-on-demand Espresso Book Machine. I’d like to work out ways to feed it quality input using only open source tools, as for now they only recommend MS Word and the pricey Adobe suite. There’s no reason that you couldn’t produce the required PDF/X files in LibreOffice or Inkscape.

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Photo taken at: Toronto Reference Library

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q absolves data sins and makes CSV queries easy

The cryptically-named q (it also bills itself as being able to “Run SQL directly on CSV files | Text as Data”) is very nifty indeed. It allows you to run SQL queries on delimited text files. It seems to support the full SQLite SQL dialect, too.

I used to frequently query the IESO‘s Hourly Wind Generator Output report (which now hides behind a JS link to obscure the source URL, http://www.ieso.ca//imoweb/pubs/marketReports/download/HourlyWindFarmGen_20160122.csv).  Now that the file has nearly 10 years of hourly data and many (but not all) wind projects, it may have outlived its usefulness. But it does allow me to show off some mad SQLite skills …

The first problem is that the file uses nasty date formats. Today would be 23-Jan-16 in the report’s Date field, which is filled with the ugh. You can fix that, though, with a fragment of SQL modified from here:

printf("%4d-%02d-%02d", substr(Date, 8,2)+2000, (instr("---JanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDec", substr(Date, 4,3))-1)/3, substr(Date, 1, 2)) as isodate

The above data definition sets the isodate column to be in the familiar and useful YYYY-MM-DD ISO format.

A related example would be to query the whole CSV file for monthly mean generation from Kingsbridge and K2 Wind projects (they’re next to one another) for months after K2’s commissioning in March 2015. Here’s what I did in q:

q -T -O -H -d, 'select printf("%4d-%02d", substr(Date, 8,2)+2000, (instr("---JanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDec", substr(Date, 4,3))-1)/3) as isomonth, avg(KINGSBRIDGE) as kavg, avg(K2WIND) as k2avg from Downloads/HourlyWindFarmGen_20160122.csv where isomonth>"2015-03" group by isomonth'

which gave the results:

isomonth    kavg    k2avg
2015-04    12.7277777778    37.4569444444
2015-05    8.94623655914    67.6747311828
2015-06    6.05833333333    66.6847222222
2015-07    3.96370967742    45.372311828
2015-08    6.34811827957    67.436827957
2015-09    7.29027777778    79.7194444444
2015-10    14.5658602151    128.037634409
2015-11    15.9944444444    130.729166667
2015-12    17.6075268817    152.422043011
2016-01    19.6408730159    163.013888889

Neat! (or at least, I think so.)

If death is not the end …

Alan Rickman reads Robyn Hitchcock’s poem “If Death is not the End …¨

Update: Robyn posted a better recording via twitter: audioBoom / Alan Rickman reads If Death Is Not The End

Self-similar petals

Self-similar petals

Original drawn in hand-coded PostScript from a path worked out using InkScape. Translating from InkScape’s SVG paths to PostScript is slightly annoying: PS uses Cartesian conventions, while SVG inverts the Y-axis. At least the SVG path commands map well to PostScript: mmoveto, ccurveto, Zclosepath, Sstroke.

There’s no magic to this figure. Each row of petals is half the length of the row outside it. As there are 6 petals arranged in a circle, each petal is 60° of arc. To make the half-step between rows, the petals are rotated 30°, so the rows have to be scaled by sin 30°, or ½.

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work as if you live in the early days of a better nation