Delicate tracings from a terrible PRNG

The two orbits of 16-bit RANDU, plotted as X-Y coordinates

I’d previously mentioned RANDU — IBM’s standard scientific PRNG in the 1970s that was somewhat lacking, to say the least —some time ago, but I found a new wrinkle.

For their 1130 small computer system, IBM published the Scientific Subroutine Package [PDF], which included a cut-down version of RANDU for this 16-bit machine. The code, on page 64 of the manual, doesn’t inspire confidence:

c     RANDU - from IBM Scientific Subroutine 
c     Package Programmer's Manual
c     1130-CM-02X - 5th ed, June 1970
c     http://media.ibm1130.org/1130-106-ocr.pdf

      SUBROUTINE RANDU(IX, IY, YFL)
      IY = IX * 899
      IF (IY) 5, 6, 6
 5    IY = IY + 32767 + 1
 6    YFL = IY
      YFL = YFL / 32727.
      RETURN
      END

(If you’re not hip to ye olde Fortran lingo, that bizarre-looking IF statement means IF (IY < 0) GO TO 5; IF (IY == 0) GO TO 6; IF (IY > 0) GO TO 6)

It accepts an odd number < 32768 as a seed, and always outputs an odd number. Yes, it basically multiplies by 899, and changes the sign if it rolls over. Umm

There are two possible orbits for this PRNG, each 8192 entries long:

  1. Starting seed 1 (899, 21769, 7835, …, 18745, 9003, 1, 899)
  2. Starting seed 5 (4495, 10541, 6407, …, 28189, 12247, 5, 4495).

The plot above is the first series as X and the second as Y. I used INTEGER*2 types to simulate the 1130’s narrow integers.

1 comment

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *