Building the Stick of Joy

Update, 2017-06: I’ve updated the plans so you shouldn’t need to spend  time sanding things to fit.

Not-even-remotely over-engineered retrogaming joystickTracking down old Atari-style joysticks for retrogaming can expensive, and it’s hard to tell if you’ll get something reliable. So I made one for less than the cost of a used stick on eBay.

To build this, you will need:

  • 8-way joystick , or any stick compatible with the industry standard Sanwa JLF-P1 mounting plate. This has M4 holes at 84 × 40 mm.
  • Two concave momentary arcade push buttons. In my built, I used an older design that’s much taller. You could make the joystick box shorter if you used these snap-in buttons.
  • DE-9 (DB-9) Female Socket Connector
  • Terminal block, with at least seven connectors. You’ll likely want more, so this 12 position screw terminal block should work.
  • 4× M4 countersunk (oval head) machine screws with nuts and lots of washers. You’ll need washers to act as spacers between the box and the joystick mounting plate. This allows the joystick’s dust washer to move freely.
  • a couple of metres of 8-core stranded signal cable
  • hookup wire and spade connectors for building the button harness.

The case is made from 6.4 mm high quality plywood, using a template generated by BoxMaker.  The external dimensions of the box are 163 mm x 143 mm x 83 mm. I haven’t included any kerf width in the design, so the edges should fit together easily for gluing.

joystick-box
Joystick box plan for download: joystick-box-201706.svg (SVG: best in Inkscape); joystick-box-201706.pdf (PDF).

If you want to make your own design, here’s the top plate plan: joystick-box-top-201706.svg (SVG); joystick-box-top-201706.pdf (PDF).

The basic DE-9 pin wiring for Atari-style joysticks goes like this:

1 — Up
2 — Down
3 — Left
4 — Right
6 — Button
8 — Ground

There are many variants that add features to this scheme, however. If you’re building for a specific computer, Tomi Engdahl’s Joystick information page has the details.

Many thanks to Andrew Horsburgh for the use of Protolab‘s laser cutter.

LibreOffice brings the old

Twenty-two years ago, I wrote a thesis. It wasn’t a very good thesis, but it did what it needed to do. For years, its model files have been unreadable, because the spreadsheets were written in a ~1992 version of Microsoft Works. These are old files:

1993-04-21 03:19 newmodel.wks
1993-04-21 03:19 newmodel.wk1
1993-04-08 06:29 pr_fa.wks

Quite recently, LibreOffice realized that there are old files out there that (unlike my thesis models) could still be useful. As they have no commercial requirement to only support the latest and greatest, LibreOffice added the ability to read these ancient works. So my old stuff lives again:

ms works files from 1993

I found a screen dump that I used back in ’93 to illustrate the layout. The display was colour, but here it is brought back to life with a little bit of antialiasing:

'93 print stylee

LibreOffice can also read old AppleWorks files. Although Works 6 still runs on Catherine‘s Mac, it looks a bit … dated:

appleworks

Thanks, LibreOffice! It’s sometimes easy to forget (like right after updated to Ubuntu 15.04, which decided that BlueTooth support was kinda optional unless you jumped through hoops …) that people do write software just to be more useful.

The shell of dead media lives on

You have to be of a certain age to recognize this:

… not just as an artist’s travel palette, but as a repurposed case for a 9-track tape spool. While tape drives were iconic for mainframe computers (so much so, there’s a Unicode glyph for them: ✇), the last drives and tapes came off the line a decade ago. They’re not truly dead until everybody forgets what these cases were originally for.