Fun things you learn from old computers …

The program on the left is running on the decimal interpreter, the one on the right the regular one

Microsoft used to supply two versions of its BASIC for Macintosh. One used decimal mathematics for precise tallying of small amounts. The other used the more familiar floating point mathematics, rounding errors and all. I don’t know what floating point library Microsoft used for sure — perhaps Motorola’s 32-bit Fast Floating Point system — but it introduces rounding errors pretty quickly. Modern routines don’t start displaying oddly until after 15 decimal places.

Consider this simple program:

10 LET x=36/10
20 LET a$="## #.#"
30 FOR n%=1 TO 18
40 PRINT USING a$; n%; x
50 LET a$=a$+"#"
60 NEXT n%
70 END

Along with the number of decimal places, it should print 3.6, 3.60, 3.600, 3.6000, … with an increasing line of zeroes after the 3.6. Bas makes a valiant but typical attempt:

 1 3.6
 2 3.60
 3 3.600
 4 3.6000
 5 3.60000
 6 3.600000
 7 3.6000000
 8 3.60000000
 9 3.600000000
10 3.6000000000
11 3.60000000000
12 3.600000000000
13 3.6000000000000
14 3.60000000000000
15 3.600000000000000
16 3.6000000000000001
17 3.60000000000000009
18 3.600000000000000089

Oddly enough, good old Locomotive BASIC on the Amstrad CPC does it more correctly somehow:

So the variables, they vary.

cbmbasic for BASIC Computer Games

Immersive it ain’t, but you have to remember it was 1978 …

cbmbasic is pretty cool. It’s a portable C rendition of the Commodore 64’s ROM BASIC interpreter. While not the spiffiest version of the language, it does allow some very old code to run — such as the games from David H. Ahl’s book BASIC Computer Games.

Here are all the programs automatically converted to cbmbasic’s tokenized format: cbmbasic-Ahl-BASIC_Games. They seem to run, but some might fail. Notes on sources of the text files and conversion methods are in the archive. Have fun!

Mac Classic II rev 2 re-capping


Since the 68kMLA wiki page on Capacitor Replacement doesn’t have it, and also doesn’t seem to be accepting new edits, here’s what you need to replace the leaky capacitors on a revision 2 Macintosh Classic II motherboard (part 820-0326-B):

  • 2× 1 µF, 50 V rating (C9, C15)
  • 3× 47 µF, 16 V rating (C3, C4, C13)
  • 12× 10 µF, 16 V rating (C5, C6, C7, C8, C10, C11, C12, C14, C21, C74, C79, C106)

You’ll probably also be looking for a 3.6 V ‘½ AA’/14250 lithium battery too, as if it hasn’t leaked in the 25 years since your Classic II was made it’ll be completely flat. These can be a bit pricey and hard to find. I got one at Sayal for nearly $10.

The revision 2 Classic II board is immediately identifiable by having only two ROM sockets where the first revision has four ROMs.

The First Program We Wrote

The First Program We Wrote

A quick throwaway dot-matrix printer lookalike. The font is Effects Eighty regular at 12 pt. The music-ruled/green bar fanfold paper simulation is something I smacked together quickly in Inkscape: fanfold-music.pdf

some OpenSCAD 2D SVG things for Josh …

I’ve found that OpenSCAD is really good for producing 2d designs in a very small amount of code. Here are three examples to play with:

Diagonal Section through Menger sponge (SVG) (OpenSCAD source) — this may take a while to render, as it’s making a Menger sponge in 3D and then slicing through it to make the projection.

(If you take out the projection() clause, it looks like this in 3D:

)

Pattern from Ak Medrese, Nigde, Turkey (SVG) (OpenSCAD source) — design after a construction by Eric Broug.

Basis of a pattern from the Alhambra (SVG) (OpenSCAD source)

The Shadows — “Rhythm & Greens” #except …

The Shadows — “Rhythm & Greens” except it gets faster every time they sing “Yeah, baby” is my humble contribution to the genre.

The original for comparison.