All posts by scruss

Stephen still a novice glove puppeteer, confirms Laureen Harper

harper_fuzzy_sharkpuppet
(image lifted from Prime Minister Stephen Harper takes another northern tour – Politics – CBC News)

Man, those Sean Kilpatrick/Canadian Press pictures from last year just keep giving! It’s a shame that the Sharky hand-puppet didn’t catch on (via fFOIA request: “… a tool to embed Capitalist values into younger children. Catchphrase: ‘It's okay to take, kids! …”) but he didn’t test well with the pre-school crowd.

Screamingly fast HWRNG on Arduino Due

Well, look at this:

$ stty -F /dev/ttyACM0 speed 115200 raw cs8
$ rngtest -t 6 < /dev/ttyACM0
  … much snippage …
rngtest: bits received from input: 312368864
rngtest: FIPS 140-2 successes: 15602
rngtest: FIPS 140-2 failures: 16
rngtest: FIPS 140-2(2001-10-10) Monobit: 2
rngtest: FIPS 140-2(2001-10-10) Poker: 2
rngtest: FIPS 140-2(2001-10-10) Runs: 8
rngtest: FIPS 140-2(2001-10-10) Long run: 4
rngtest: FIPS 140-2(2001-10-10) Continuous run: 0
rngtest: input channel speed: (min=837.317; avg=1168.033; max=1948.060)Kibits/s
rngtest: FIPS tests speed: (min=16.834; avg=27.779; max=77.221)Mibits/s
rngtest: Program run time: 271917796 microseconds

Over a megabit/second of decent quality random data. This is from an Arduino Due, which has an Atmel SAM3X8E ARM Cortex-M3 microcontroller on board. I hadn’t found much use for this board previously, as it fell between a regular 8-bit Arduino and my (many!) Raspberry Pis.

This changed when I found out about Walter Anderson’s Entropy library, which uses µc timer jitter as a source of entropy. Originally designed as a slow but true source of random integers on the Atmel AVR chips, it’s been extended to use the SAM3X8E‘s built-in hardware RNG. Since the Due has a native USB port, you’re not limited to standard baud rates.

Here’s the code, trivially modified from one of Walter’s examples:

// Generate_Random_Bytes_Due - speedy demo of Arduino Due's HWRNG
// based on Generate_Random_Bytes, for Entropy, an Arduino library.
// Copyright 2012 by Walter Anderson
//  modified - scruss - 2014-08-13
// remember to reconnect to native USB port

#include <Entropy.h>

void setup() {
  SerialUSB.begin(115200);
  while (!SerialUSB) {
    ; // wait for serial port to connect.
  }
  Entropy.initialize();
}

void loop() {
  uint16_t r = Entropy.random();
  SerialUSB.write(lowByte(r));
  SerialUSB.write(highByte(r));
}

It’s a minor pain to have to reconnect the USB cable to the other port on the Arduino Due after programming, but it’s worth it just to see an 84 MHz µc belting out random bytes 37½% faster than an 800 MHz Raspberry Pi